Enabling the Future Internet for Smart Cities

Enabling the Future Internet for Smart Cities

Design and evaluation of a scalable smart city software platform with large-scale simulations

Smart Cities combine advances in Internet of Things, Big Data, Social Networks, and Cloud Computing technologies with the demand for cyber–physical applications in areas of public interest, such as Health, Public Safety, and Mobility. The end goal is to leverage the use of city resources to improve the quality of life of its citizens. Achieving this goal, however, requires advanced support for the development and operation of applications in a complex and dynamic environment. Middleware platforms can provide an integrated infrastructure that enables solutions for smart cities by combining heterogeneous city devices and providing unified, high-level facilities for the development of applications and services. Although several smart city platforms have been proposed in the literature, there are still open research and development challenges related to their scalability, maintainability, interoperability, and reuse in the context of different cities, to name a few. Moreover, available platforms lack extensive scientific validation, which hinders a comparative analysis of their applicability. Aiming to close this gap, we propose InterSCity, a microservices-based, open-source, smart city platform that enables the collaborative development of large-scale systems, applications, and services for the cities of the future, contributing to turn them into truly smart cyber–physical environments. In this paper, we present the architecture of the InterSCity platform, followed by a comprehensive set of experiments that evaluate its scalability. The experiments were conducted using a smart city simulator to generate realistic workloads used to assess the platform in extreme conditions. The experimental results demonstrate that the platform can scale horizontally to handle the highly dynamic demands of a large smart city while maintaining low response times. The experiments also show the effectiveness of the technique used to generate synthetic workloads.